The Waterrower has recently been made famous by Kevin Spacy as the rowing machine used in the ‘House of Cards’. It is a type of wooden rowing machine produced and manufactured by Waterrower Inc. in New England, USA. The rowers were designed by ex-US national team rower john Duke in the mid 1980’s and the company to manufacture them was established in 1988.
Rowers may take part in the sport for their leisure or they may row competitively. There are different types of competition in the sport of rowing. In the U.S. all types of races are referred to as regattas whereas this term is only used in the UK for head-to-head or multi-lane races (such as those that take place at Dorney Lake), which generally take place in the summer season. Time trials occur in the UK during the winter, and are referred to as Head races. In the US, head races (usually about 5k, depending on the body of water) are rowed in the fall, while 2k sprint races are rowed in the spring and summer.

It is time to get into shape.  After doing some research and talking to a few experts, at least more expert than me, I determined rowing and swimming would be the best for me to loose weight with less strain on my body.  I researched and decided to rent (not buy) a Water Rower.  The one page rental application  is simple to complete and the staff telephone contacts were great, they answered questions, provided updates, made suggestions  etc.   The equipment showed up as promised.  Assembly is very simple one person job  and took just about a half hour, only one small allen wrench is required and it is provided. (save the box, its big but needs to be saved in the event you return the equipment)  The machine is classic and elegant.  It is not silent but the water swoosh sound is quite relaxing and soft.  I rented a previously used matching which is slightly less expensive  and shows a tiny bit of use but its exercise equipment so it is expected.  Customer service is outstanding and friendly.  The equipment seems really well designed and is simple to stand up and get out of the way.  The only issue I had involved the the filling of the tank.  Its cumbersome and could be made easier by a more convenient placement of the fill hole, it seems to be a slight design flaw.  I used a new long funnel (used to add oil to a car).  I checked out a few Youtube posts and videos and other users had the same minor complaint but overall everyone is really happy with this equipment.  NOW I NEED to MAKE MYSELF USE IT.
Adaptive rowing is a special category of races for those with physical disabilities. Under FISA rules there are 5 boat classes for adaptive rowers; mixed (2 men and 2 women plus cox) LTA (Legs, Trunk, Arms), mixed intellectual disability (2 men and 2 women plus cox) LTA (Legs, Trunk, Arms), mixed (1 man and 1 woman) TA (Trunk and Arms), and men's and women's AS (Arms and Shoulders). Events are held at the World Rowing Championships and were also held at the 2008 Summer Paralympics.[59]
If you are anything like me, you read the negative reviews to see what some of the complaints could potentially be...I have found none that match with my machine or experience so far. The boxes it came in were a little bunged-up but everything on the inside was perfect. Only took about 15-20 minutes to build (first time building a row machine) and another 5-10 to fill with water. We used it for a little while before we added the danish oil.

The meter didn't work properly. It wasn't keeping the distance - we would row for 30 mins and wouldn't even be at 1km!!! And the strokes per minute was reading double strokes (which the company said was normal - huh?). Their customer service team was good and tried to make it work but we ended up returning it and spent the extra money to get a WaterRower and it is amazing!!!
Outside of resistance type, we found the number-one arbiter of ride feel to be cord quality. Water ergometers tend to employ nylon cords, while air ergometers feature metal chains — a durability factor we anticipated would result in our favoring air. But while all three water rowers aced our expectation of smooth, high-tension strokes, perfecting the chain seems to be more difficult: Some tug with just a slight rumble, others feature bouncy, grinding chains that are incredibly loud, something akin to angry snoring. As for nylon, the best wind and unwind like elastic silk — no slack, no sound, no catching, just perfectly even tension throughout the stroke.
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