The A1 S4 Driftwood by WaterRower delivers a total body workout, caters to fitness goals and exercise requirements. This rower is ...crafted out of fine-quality driftwood with an aluminum monorail. It is perfect for home or gym use and has a maximum user weight capacity of 375 pounds. The A1 S4 Driftwoood boasts features such as the WaterRower patented WaterFlywheel that gives life-like water rowing experience, a unique self-regulating resistance with infinite variable which suits any user, contoured seat with wheels that glide along the rail and comfortable rowing handles. It also comes with an S4 monitor that shows time per 2 or 500 kilometers, calories burned per hour, distance covered and total time of workouts. Maintenance of this rower is minimal. Simply add a purification tablet every 3-6 months. Tablets come with the package. When not in use, store the A1 S4 Driftwood vertically against a wall or in a closet. Buy your very own high-quality WaterRower Rowing Machine from Dazadi and get free shipping with every purchase. *WATER ROWER FOR HOME AND GYM USE - Crafted out of high-quality driftwood with aluminum monorail with no impact and non-load bearing, making it perfect for users with joint problems. Targets 84% of all major muscle areas like the arms, legs, back, shoulders, chest, core, etc. Water rower dimensions: 83 L x 22.5 W x 22.5 H Inches / Weight: 110 Pounds*LIFE-LIKE WATER ROWING EXPERIENCE - Features patented WaterFlywheel, unique self-regulating resistance, ergonomic seat and handles. Suits any user without need for adjustments. Maximum user weight: 375 Pounds. *TRACK YOUR PROGRESS - Water Rower comes with an intelligent S4 monitor that shows time per 2 or 500 kilometers, watts, calories burned per hour, distance, and the total time of workouts.*LOW MAINTENANCE AND SPACE EFFICIENT - This water rowing machine does not require lubrication or maintenance. User simply needs to add a purification tablet in the water every 3-6 months (tablets come with the package). When not in use, tip vertically against a wall or store in closet conveniently. read more

At the catch the rower places the blade in the water and applies pressure to the oar by pushing the seat toward the bow of the boat by extending the legs, thus pushing the boat through the water. The point of placement of the blade in the water is a relatively fixed point about which the oar serves as a lever to propel the boat. As the rower's legs approach full extension, the rower pivots the torso toward the bow of the boat and then finally pulls the arms towards his or her chest. The hands meet the chest right above the diaphragm.
In the 1950s- and 1960s, more sports coaches began to use rowing machines for training and assessment of athletes' performance. One such rower developed at this time was the Harrison-Cotton machine, the brainchild of John Harrison of Leichhardt Rowing Club in Sydney and Professor Frank Cotton, produced by Ted Curtain Engineering. This was the very first piece of equipment able to measure athletic power with great accuracy, and it also imitated the actual experience of rowing more closely than any previous rowing machine.
Amateur competition in England began towards the end of the 18th century. Documentary evidence from this period is sparse, but it is known that the Monarch Boat Club of Eton College and the Isis Club of Westminster School were both in existence in the 1790s. The Star Club and Arrow Club in London for gentlemen amateurs were also in existence before 1800. At the University of Oxford bumping races were first organised in 1815 when Brasenose College and Jesus College boat clubs had the first annual race[14] while at Cambridge the first recorded races were in 1827.[15] Brasenose beat Jesus to win Oxford University's first Head of the River; the two clubs claim to be the oldest established boat clubs in the world. The Boat Race between Oxford University and Cambridge University first took place in 1829, and was the second intercollegiate sporting event (following the first Varsity Cricket Match by 2 years). The interest in the first Boat Race and subsequent matches led the town of Henley-on-Thames to begin hosting an annual regatta in 1839.[16]
In sweep or sweep-oar rowing, each rower has one oar, held with both hands. This is generally done in pairs, fours, and eights. In some regions of the world, each rower in a sweep boat is referred to either as port or starboard, depending on which side of the boat the rower's oar extends to. In other regions, the port side is referred to as stroke side, and the starboard side as bow side; this applies even if the stroke oarsman is rowing on bow side and/or the bow oarsman on stroke side.
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