The coxswain (or simply the cox) is the member who sits in the boat facing the bow, steers the boat, and coordinates the power and rhythm of the rowers - by communicating to the crew through a device called a cox box and speakers. They usually sit in the stern of the boat, except in bowloaders where the coxswain lies in the bow. Bowloader are usually seen as the coxed four and coxed pair type of boat.
Rowing machines were first used in Archaic Greece. Chabrias, an Athenian military general in 4th Century B.C., invented wooden rowing simulators for his inexperienced oarsmen. This enabled them to learn technique and timing before stepping foot on actual water crafts. And it must have worked — Chabrias successfully led numerous naval attacks against the Spartans.
There is much to love about the WaterRower--and I do love it--but I would echo others' comments that although the seat rolls solidly and smoothly on the wood rails, the seat itself is very hard (I use a gel seat pad I bought for my hard fiberglass kayak seat), and the footpads are in need up rethinking and upgrading--the cheap plastic doesn't let you row in socks or barefoot and is not really worthy of a machine that is otherwise a stunning piece of engineering and a beautiful one as well. As one other person noted about his machine, my machine made a clicking noise on the return stroke, so I had to adjust the wheel underneath the top rail that connects to the footpad and pull it away gently from where it was rubbing against another component. Also, be warned: the instruction booklet is in the DVD case. I did not see the little sticker on the case telling me that, thinking I'd wait to watch the DVD until after I'd assembled it. But WaterRower has a copy of the assembly instructions on their website, along with a video (I found the written ones better and easier to follow), so I was able to assemble it with no difficulty.
Wave water resistance feels and sounds like rowing on the water. Water resistance provides a dynamic rowing stroke with infinite resistance levels. Siphon included for filling and removing water from reservoir. Wide, molded seat for comfort. Ball-bearing rollers for smooth seat gliding. Multi-function monitor provides instant feedback on your workout. Padded, textured rowing handle for better grip. Pivoting footplates with adjustable strap to secure feet. Folding frame for storage. Wheels for transport. Leveling endcaps with dial to ensure stability. Nylon rowing strap. Blue water tank. Padded seat. Targeted training: Full body strength and cardio. Weight capacity: 300 lbs.. Warranty: Three years on frame and 90 days on parts. Made from steel. Black finish. Minimal assembly required. 85.35 in. L x 20.25 in. W x 33.75 in. H (71.7 lbs.). Instruction Manual. Real Water Resistance: Because the Stamina Wave Water Rowing Machine incorporates water resistance, users will truly feel as though they are out on the lake or river. Water resistance makes the rowing stroke smoother and more consistent, but most importantly, it offers infinite resistance. Just like rowing on water, faster, harder pushes increase the resistance. To further increase or decrease the resistance, you can add or remove water with the included siphon. Even more, water in the reservoir mimics the sound of moving water, which makes the indoor rowing experience more lifelike. Built to Endure While Building Endurance: The Wave Water Rowing Machine is built to last no matter how often you use it. With steel frame construction and rowing beam, the rower can withstand years of prolonged, intense use. Even more, the sturdy, pivoting footplates with straps keep you secure during your workout while the rower itself is stabilized on leveling endcaps with dials. To further motivate you, the rower also comes equipped with a multi-function monitor that tracks dis
Outside of resistance type, we found the number-one arbiter of ride feel to be cord quality. Water ergometers tend to employ nylon cords, while air ergometers feature metal chains — a durability factor we anticipated would result in our favoring air. But while all three water rowers aced our expectation of smooth, high-tension strokes, perfecting the chain seems to be more difficult: Some tug with just a slight rumble, others feature bouncy, grinding chains that are incredibly loud, something akin to angry snoring. As for nylon, the best wind and unwind like elastic silk — no slack, no sound, no catching, just perfectly even tension throughout the stroke.
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