When waves run into water moving in the opposite direction, they are slowed, just as if they were approaching a beach. Wave length becomes shorter, wave height higher, and they may break. A good (bad) example of this is an ebb current flowing out of Raccoon Strait into waves coming in from the Golden Gate. Good rough water training, if that’s what you want.
If you're looking at a WaterRower, you're probably also considering the Concept2. They're both great machines, but which you choose depends on your needs. I think the WaterRower is ideal for most people, but not everyone. The WaterRower has a number of advantages vs the Concept 2 - it is quieter, the mechanism up front is lower profile, it has a comfortable seat, it is much better looking, it's easier to stand up when you're not rowing and it's just ... zen-like. There is something about the smoothness of the WaterRower that makes it a joy to use, and because it's quiet you can easily stream your favorite binge-series without cranking the volume too high.
Row machine looks like it's a $600 unit. If you're in the market for a water rower I'd spend the money on the real Water Rower. I was wanting the Water Rower but after this poor experience I just want something that lasts and is warranted the longest. I purchased a concept2 that had arrived and is a much better quality unit. The computer is much better.
If you’re interested in using a rowing machine for focused training — whether for outdoor rowing, an indoor competition, or as part of a larger fitness program — you’ll want air resistance. If you’re drawn to rowers for the enjoyability (alongside the full-body, cardio-plus-strength training efficacy) of a rowing workout, consider a machine with water resistance.
* While there is nothing to adjust from row to row on the WaterRower, it is possible to increase or decrease the level of resistance by changing how much water you put in the drum. The monitor is pre-calibrated to match 17 liters of water, but you can change that if you want. More than 17 liters = more resistance, up to the max fill line. This is not something you'll want to change frequently, it's more of a set-it-and-forget-it thing.
If you are anything like me, you read the negative reviews to see what some of the complaints could potentially be...I have found none that match with my machine or experience so far. The boxes it came in were a little bunged-up but everything on the inside was perfect. Only took about 15-20 minutes to build (first time building a row machine) and another 5-10 to fill with water. We used it for a little while before we added the danish oil.
PROVIDES GREAT TRACTION - Even during your most intense rowing routine, you need not worry about the unit slipping or sliding arou...nd your space. Mat Dimensions: 90 L x 36 W x .25 H inches/ Weight: 8 pounds.PROTECTS FLOORS - This WaterRower Mat is made of PVC Foam and helps protect your floors and carpets from scatches, scrapes, debris and sweat. It can even double as an extra mat for aerobics or yoga.EASY TO CLEAN AND STORE - After each use, it is good to give the mat a good wipe with a damp cloth to keep it clean. It rolls easily for storage under the bed or closet and will not take much space.PERFECT FOR ANY WATERROWER ROWING MACHINE - This 7.5-Feet long mat will perfectly fit under any of your WaterRower Rowing Machines.FREE SHIPPING - Buy this 7.5-inch long floor protecting mat from Dazadi and get free shipping. read more
Rowing whether competitive and recreational is unique compared to most sports because this type of aerobic exercise gives all your major muscle groups a beneficial workout. Everything from your legs, back, and arms are engaged while rowing. This is a low-impact sport, the rowing stroke is a fairly safe motion, providing little room for the serious injury often found in contact and high-impact sports.

THL: Stay a safe distance from vertical surfaces if there are significant waves present in the area. A passing boat or ship may generate big waves that escape your attention until there is no time to escape. An example is the North anchorage of the Golden Gate Bridge (but there are special cases, e.g. rough water classes or the OWRC regatta, when there is a fast flood coming through the Golden Gate, and it is useful to be close to the wall since the current is slower there).
Another negative point for me is the angle of the seat. Unlike the Concept2, it has a slight backward angle, which makes it easier to maintain good form at the end of the stroke. Given that the Waterrower has greater resistance at the catch, it puts more pressure on the lower back at this point making it uncomfortable for people like myself with lumbar spine problems.
The WaterRower US office got in on the Pull for a Cure fundraising action and all pulled together to raise money for breast cancer! - - - - As many of you may already know, throughout the month of October, WaterRower has been raising money through our Pull for a Cure fundraiser. For each 500m workout rowed and posted online, we'll be donating $1 towards breast cancer research! Don't forget to get your workouts in before Monday, October 31st! #PullForaCure #WaterRower
This rower has been designed to ensure stroke consistency and utilises a triple blade impeller system. Perfect for smaller houses or apartments, this model includes the easy tilt feature for fast fold-up and storing. Assembly is a one man job that will take twenty to thirty minutes to complete. A step by step illustrated instruction manual has been included, in addition to all of the tools needed for this process.
In the 1950s- and 1960s, more sports coaches began to use rowing machines for training and assessment of athletes' performance. One such rower developed at this time was the Harrison-Cotton machine, the brainchild of John Harrison of Leichhardt Rowing Club in Sydney and Professor Frank Cotton, produced by Ted Curtain Engineering. This was the very first piece of equipment able to measure athletic power with great accuracy, and it also imitated the actual experience of rowing more closely than any previous rowing machine.
Blades, otherwise known as oars to amateurs or non rowers, are used to propel the boat. They are long (sculling: 250–300 cm; sweep oar: 340–360 cm) poles with one flat end about 50 cm long and 25 cm wide, called the blade. Classic blades were made out of wood, but modern blades are made from more expensive and durable synthetic material, the most common being carbon fiber.

Motion of the water is different than the motion of the wave. Water at each location moves in a circular path, but the motions at different locations are “out of phase”, which means that when water at the left of the diagram is moving to the right, water a quarter of a wavelength to the right is moving down, and water next to it is moving to the left, and next to it is moving up, etc. The overall effect is a an “apparent” wave moving to the right. Thus, the velocity (speed) of a wave is not at all the same as the velocity of the water.
When waves run into water moving in the opposite direction, they are slowed, just as if they were approaching a beach. Wave length becomes shorter, wave height higher, and they may break. A good (bad) example of this is an ebb current flowing out of Raccoon Strait into waves coming in from the Golden Gate. Good rough water training, if that’s what you want. 
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